Reported Intake of Selected Micronutrients and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: Results from a Large Population-based Case-control Study in Newfoundland, Labrador and Ontario, Canada

Lay Summary 

Aim:
The impact of micronutrient intake and colorectal cancer (CRe) risk is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the associations of selected micronutrients with risk of incident CRC in study participants from Newfoundland, Labrador (NL) and Ontario (ON), Canada.

Materials and Methods:
We conducted a population-based study among 1760 case participants and 2481 age- and sex-matched control participants. Information on diet and other lifestyle factors were measured using a food frequency questionnaire and a personal history questionnaire. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression, controlling for covariables.

Results:
Highest compared to lowest quartile intakes of certain micronutrients were associated with lower risk of CRC, including: calcium (from food and supplements (FS), OR=0.59; 95% CI=0.45-0.77, and from food only (FO): OR=0.76, 95% C1=0.59-0.97), vitamin C (FS:OR=0.67; 95%CI:0.51-0.88), vitamin D (FS: OR=0.73; 95% CI: 0.57-0.94, Fa: OR=0.79, 95% CI=0.62-1.00), riboflavin (FS: OR=0.61; 95% CI=0.47-0.78, and folate (FS: OR=O.72; 95% CI=0.56-0.92). Higher risk of CRC was observed for iron intake (highest versus lowest quintiles: OR=1.34, 95% CI=1.01-1.78). Conclusion: This study presents evidence that dietary intake of calcium, vitamin D, vitamin C, riboflavin and folate are associated with a lower risk of incident CRC and that dietary intake of iron may be associated with a higher risk of the disease.

Anticancer Research, February 2012, vol. 32, no.2: 697-696

Departments 
Community Health and Humanities
Communities 
St. John's
Locations 
Newfoundland and Labrador
Ontario
Canada
Themes 
Cancer
Industry Sectors 
Scientific Research and Development Services
Health Care and Social Assistance
Start date 
1 Jan 2012