Testing the effects of hydropower transmission line right-of-ways on wildlife movements and predator-prey dynamics

Lay Summary 

Hydroelectricity is a renewable energy source used across Canada. Since power plants are usually located in remote areas, electricity must be transported to the communities that require its supply. This requires the construction of transport networks through wilderness that could affect wildlife in addition to rural and indigenous communities that depend on wildlife for their cultural, spiritual and livelihood customs. Understanding the effects of electrical transportation networks on key species such as wolves, we will help decipher the effects of low-density anthropogenic features on predator (wolf) ecology and prey (moose) population dynamics. This project is important for our partner, Manitoba Hydro, like other companies that generate and transmit electricity in Canada (Nalcor Energy and its subsidiaries). This project is also important for the rural and indigenous communities through which the power lines are routed. We anticipate that from the results of this project, we will be able to illustrate how resource selection, movements, attack rate and predation rate of wolves on moose are affected by power lines. The results of this project will influence how Manitoba Hydro constructs power transmission lines and demonstrate how to mitigate the effects of power transmission lines when necessary. This research will be of importance to Canada and to Canadians given the increase in hydroelectric development across the country, as well as the need to better understand the effects (e.g., local, ecological, environmental) of significant anthropogenic development in the Canadian landscape. In addition, Canada and Canadians will benefit from this information by helping hydropower companies decide on power transmission line routing and monitoring the effects of power transmission lines, taking into account possible local and ecological effects that may arise. these important anthropogenic developments will bring to the landscape. local, ecological, environmental) of significant anthropogenic development in the Canadian landscape. In addition, Canada and Canadians will benefit from this information by helping hydropower companies decide on power transmission line routing and monitoring the effects of power transmission lines, taking into account possible local and ecological effects that may arise. these important anthropogenic developments will bring to the landscape. local, ecological, environmental) of significant human development in the Canadian landscape. In addition, Canada and Canadians will benefit from this information by helping hydropower companies decide on power transmission line routing and monitoring the effects of power transmission lines, taking into account possible local and ecological effects that may arise. these important anthropogenic developments will bring to the landscape.

 

Adapted from https://www.nserc-crsng.gc.ca/ase-oro/Details-Detailles_eng.asp?id=689396

Departments 
Biology
Funding 
Natural Sciences And Engineering Research Council Of Canada
Locations 
Newfoundland and Labrador
Manitoba
Themes 
Wildlife
Hydroelectric Power
Start date 
1 Jan 2016
End date 
31 Dec 2020
Partner Organization 
Manitoba Hydro
Nalcor Energy